Nelson Harris Nelson A. Harris $voices Carlaflagg Igv2 006 KENNETH G. GROGGS Damaris Hollingsworth, March 2021 Voice Founder James C. Dodd JAMES C. DODD Spotlight Bwa 004 800x JOHN S. CHASE $voices Garynelson Ig 003 800x WENDELL CAMPBELL 002 800x LEROY CAMPBELL Spotlight Atlanta 001 800x WILLIAM M. BROWN JR. $year 50 Logo Finals 4d Foil

NOMA Elevates Justice for All

On May 31, 2020, the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) responded with a tremendously heavy heart in reaction to the murder of George Floyd. This tragedy was emblematic of a larger system of oppression and injustice in the U.S. After the release of our B.R.A.V.E. statement, NOMA’s leadership was heartened by the colleagues, friends, and allies that reached out with support and acknowledgment of the long-standing racial divide in the nation and in our industry.

On April 20, 2021, a jury honored the value of George Floyd’s life with a guilty verdict rendered in the trial of Derek Chauvin – a white man and police officer who senselessly murdered Floyd in Minneapolis. While more discriminate violence at the hands of police continued, the country waited with bated breath and a mix of emotions as the guilty verdict was shared. For most across our communities, our immediate reactions of relief & celebration, quickly turned to reflective sadness & frustration once we realized we were celebrating something that should be so clear and apparent for our legal justice system.

Yesterday’s guilty verdict is NOT JUSTICE. Justice comes with the deliverance of quick and fair sentencing, without risk of delays or approved appeals. Yesterday’s guilty verdict is ACCOUNTABILITY. Accountability that was long overdue, and required the world’s focus, a national movement, countless protests, and the courage of a select few officers to bravely cross the blue wall of silence against a white police officer who kneeled on a Black man’s neck for nine minutes and 29 seconds.

Read the complete statement on the President’s Desk.

 

$voices Carlaflagg Homepg

NOMA Voices

NOMA members speakout about their experience

In case you missed it, we’ve just introduced NOMA Voices! Here we will share member stories and how NOMA has influenced their careers and daily lives. This platform will serve as a source for elevating and celebrating our members through the lens of NOMA National. NOMA has become the go-to resource for industry leaders and media searching for talented people of color. Narratives shared will give members the opportunity to convey the impact of NOMA stemming from their experience to the industry at large. Our current vocalist is award winner Carla Flagg!

#educate #ELEVATE #empower

Learn more

Things You Should Know About

Celebrating NOMA's 50th Anniversary, One Founder at a Time

Nelson Harris NOMA

May 2021

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

Nelson A. Harris

A native of Ohio, Nelson Arthur Harris, Sr. was a witness to the racism of the deep north of the United States. His family was threatened by a local group of the Klu Klux Klan when he was a young boy, but the Firestone Family of Akron, for whom his father occasionally worked, intervened to secure their safety. More of his story

April 2021

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

Kenneth G. Groggs

Kenneth Gene Groggs, a founder of the National Organization of Minority Architects was the first black person to serve as Illinois State Architect. A native of Kansas, Mr. Groggs was president of Groggs & Associates, which he founded in 1983. Link to page.

March 2021

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

James C. Dodd

Known as Sacramento’s first African American architect, James C. Dodd worked on a number of Sacramento buildings. He was in business in Sacramento for more than 40 years. Architectural drawings and specifications by Dodd and Associates of Sacramento area buildings including Del Paso Heights Schools, McClellan Air Force Base remodels, Saint Hope Academy, Netta Sparks Women’s Civic Improvement Club, and private residences such as the Edna Wright house, Hill House and James Jones’ house. Link to page.

February 2021

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

John S. Chase

John Saunders Chase was born on January 23, 1925, in Annapolis, Maryland. He attended Hampton University, earning a Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree from Hampton University in 1948. Hampton’s job placement program led Chase to Austin, Texas, where he worked as a draftsman and contractor, and where he met and married Drucie Rucker Chase, whom he referred to as “the wind beneath his sails.” On June 7, 1950, at the University of Texas in Austin, John Saunders Chase became the first African American to enroll at a major university in the South. Read more of his story here.

January 2021

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

Wendell Campbell

Wendell Campbell, nationally recognized architect and urban planner, passed away peacefully Wednesday, July 9, 2008. Mr. Campbell was 81 years old.

Born on April 27, 1927 Mr. Campbell grew up in East Chicago, IN the fourth of six children. He was often called to work alongside his father, a carpenter, who demanded perfection in every project. Following fourteen months of service Mr. Campbell was honorably discharged and he returned home to study architecture. Mr. Campbell was the recipient of several scholarships and he graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1957 with a B.A. in Architecture and City Planning. Read more of his story here.

December 2020

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

Leroy M. Campbell

Leroy Campbell, AIA NOMA was born on July 5, 1927, in New York City. After graduating from Rock Castle High School in Virginia, he attended the school of Architecture at Howard University from which he graduated in 1951.

After working with several firms in the Washington DC area. Leroy met John D. Sulton, his future partner, while working with Hillard Robinson, FAIA. In 1964, Leroy and John formed the successful firm of Sulton Campbell & Associates, Chartered. Their firm was once one of the largest firms in the area with offices in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland. Although his experience was wide-ranging, most of Campbell’s work consisted of large scale housing developments. Institutional architecture, transportation projects and medical facilities. Read more of his story here.

November 2020

In celebrating our legends and echoing a core value of honoring our rich legacy, the NOMA 50th Anniversary Task Force, in partnership with the Historian Committee, is proud to introduce you to our Founding heroes.

William M. Brown, Jr.

William M. Brown Jr., affectionately called “Bill,” was born and raised in the City of Newark, NJ. He attended Newark Public Schools, South Street School and Franklin Ave Schools be­fore attending Barringer High School. Bill graduated from Howard University in 1952, with a Bachelor of Architecture/Construction degree.

He joined forces with his colleague Reginald C. Hale, also a Howard University School of Architecture graduate, to open the first African- American architectural firm in the City of Newark, NJ, Brown and Hale Architects, in 1962. Along with a long list of accomplishments, William M. Brown Jr. became the first African- American President of the Newark and Suburban Architects in 1973. Read more of his amazing story here.

Inspiration

View02 View01 View00 View03 View05